Goong Ob Woon Sen

This dish is served in practically all classy Thai restaurants in Singapore, but do you know that goong ob woon sen (shrimp baked in tung hoon) is actually considered street food in Thailand? What’s more, it ridiculously easy to cook. So if you’re ready, here goes.

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The star of the dish – shrimp. Most cooks don’t shell them, but I prefer them partially peeled, head intact.

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Start the pot and fry some garlic and ginger slices. Most Thai cooks don’t mince the ginger. I guess that makes sense. Those who wish to eat the garlic have a choice of picking it up and those who don’t won’t accidentally ingest.

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More flavours in the form of black pepper, coriander seeds and cilantro roots. Fry them up really well.

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The bulk of the liquid actually comes from Chinese wine. Add oyster sauce and light soya sauce as well. Then, throw in the shrimp and bring to a boil.

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Once the liquid is boiling, add in the soaked tung hoon or woon sen as it is called in Thailand.

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Also throw in the chopped cilantro leaves. Give the mixture a good stir.

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Put on the lid, “bake” for 5 minutes and we’re ready to serve!

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This humble dish is packed with flavours so strong that they can knock you out. Could be the wine though.

Chan Joon Yee is the author of Spellbound in Chiangmai, a collection of short stories based on sheltered and simple Singaporeans’ misadventures in the Land of Smiles.

Gai Phad Bai Kraprao (Thai Basil Chicken)

This is a ubiquitous dish that can be found on every street in Thailand. Together with a fried egg and some rice, it makes the ultimate economical breakfast, lunch or dinner. The preparation is so simple that you won’t believe it. Let’s have a look at the ingredients.

I have chopped chilli padi, chopped garlic and crushed black pepper.

The main ingredients are diced chicken seasoned with oyster sauce and basil leaves. Sorry they look a bit shrivelled. Leftovers from Vietnamese popiah. The video below shows how it is done. Once again, I demonstrate my single-handed frying.

A bit of dark soya sauce has been stirred in before I threw in the basil leaves. I hope you can smell this and I can assure you that it really tastes great. If your kids can handle the chilli padi, they’ll love it too.

Chan Joon Yee is the author of Spellbound in Chiangmai, a collection of short stories based on sheltered and simple Singaporeans’ misadventures in the Land of Smiles.

Vietnamese Popiah

This should be the second time I’m preparing this dish. which is inspired by a similar dish I ordered at Kad Farang, Hang Dong, Thailand.

I tasted mint leaves, basil and shrimp, so here it is – my interpretation.

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Most of the ingredients are here – all available at Cold Storage.

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The sweet and sour dipping sauce is all important to this dish. I’ve decided to use honey as my sweetener.

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Shrimp and bean sprouts, all done in less than 5 mins. I like my bean sprouts crunchy. A couple of table spoons of soya sauce would be all the seasoning you need.

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For the sourness, I add vinegar. Some crushed peanuts appeared in the sauce at the restaurant. I’ve decided to follow that.

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My wrapping skills still have some way to go, but I think I did a pretty decent job here. In terms of taste, I like it even better than the restaurant dish. Go try it yourself.